Ted Nugent- Ted Nugent (1975): 28 October 2019

Ted Nugent – Ted Nugent (1975)

Welcome back to YDCS! We have another rocking album this week so strap in for the debut album by the Motor City Madman, Ted Nugent! After the dissolution of his first band, The Amboy Dukes, Nugent decided to go solo and release his first solo studio album that would become a driving force in the heavy metal and hard rock genres. The ‘Nuge was on the forefront of the genre during its heyday, but was definitely more second wave heavy metal/hard rock, the first generation being acts like Black Sabbath, Led Zeppelin, and Deep Purple. Nugent’s contemporaries were later acts in a more established genre like Dio, Judas Priest, and AC/DC. Ted Nugent showed what could really be done when you put the guitar in the front, keep the band small, and let natural skills shine through.

Ted Nugent is an interesting album. On one hand, it features some of its namesake’s biggest songs and displays a great deal of skill and versatility on the guitar. On the other hand, there’s a good amount of filler material that doesn’t help the album as a whole. This is one of those albums where the highs are really high and the lows feel lower than they really are because of how stratospherically good a few songs are. Give it a listen and let me know what you think!

Dad’s Thoughts- The Breakdown

Stranglehold: Just go ahead and open up the album with a heavy, eight-minute long guitar solo. It certainly sets the mood for the rest of the record! Nugent didn’t pull any punches on “Stranglehold.” This track became one of Nugent’s best-known songs and is regularly featured in concerts and on the radio today. When I was a teenager, “Stranglehold” was one of the first songs to open my ears to the sound of classic rock, particularly dark and bluesy sounds. Because of that, this song holds a special place to me. The guitar work is nothing short of amazing; it manages to be both melodic and feature big, loud power chords. That’s a true testament to Nugent’s talent on the guitar. Dad’s Rating 9/10

Stormtroopin’: “Stormtroopin’” is the less-impressive version of “Stranglehold” in my opinion. It’s less melodic and doesn’t show quite the range of ability. It’s still a fun song and the drum fill in the middle before the solo is a cool piece, but it isn’t special. Give this track a listen if you’ve never listened to Nugent before since this is one of his more popular songs, but don’t expect another “Stranglehold.” Dad’s Rating 6/10

Hey Baby: Now this is a solid blues-inspired rock track if I’ve ever heard one! This song rocks. Period. You have everything that makes a great blues-rock track; screaming guitars, blues scale, half-sung, half-spoken lyrics. It’s dirty, pure, and unabashedly rock and roll. Right on! Dad’s Rating 7/10

Just What the Doctor Ordered: If “Stranglehold” was the album’s opus, “Just What the Doctor Ordered” would be the runner up. The guitar riff on this track is so catchy that it’s hard not to sing along to this ‘infectious’ song! Musically it’s not the most impressive; the guitar solo is good but the rest of the song is an average rock song. “Doctor” is a fun song because of the stellar, bouncy delivery that makes you groove. Dad’s Rating 8/10

Snakeskin Cowboys: “Snakeskin Cowboys” is one of the more forgettable songs on the record. It’s got some good musical moments, but they don’t overshadow the fact that the song is little more than album filler. Dad’s Rating 5/10

Motor City Madhouse: I like this song from a music history perspective. You can hear the beginnings of a new generation of rockers being born out of “Motor City Madhouse.” Think about groups like Jane’s Addiction and Primus that got their starts in the late 80s during the alternative rock, pre-grunge movement. I believe that a lot of their sound can be traced back to songs like this that would have been popular during their formative music years. Musically, this is a neat song and the drum solo at the end was, in fact, a madhouse. The Motor City Madman delivered on this song. Dad’s Rating 6/10

Where Have You Been All My Life: This track suffers from “Snakeskin Cowboy Syndrome.” It’s not a bad blues rock song, but it’s mostly filler and doesn’t do anything to improve the album. The album wouldn’t suffer by its exclusion. Dad’s Rating 5/10

You Make Me Feel Right At Home: This was a new track for me, and I was actually surprised to hear almost a soft rock song on a Ted Nugent album, but it works really well! This is one of the only chances we get to hear more from his backing band, and they did a great job. The keyboard work, soft vocals, and great percussion work (check out that xylophone!) add different layers to the album and shows that the band wasn’t just a one-trick pony with hard rock. Great hidden gem here, don’t skip this one! Dad’s Rating 7/10

Queen of the Forest: We finish the album with a solid rocker. I would place this song one step above the songs that suffer from “Snakeskin Cowboy Syndrome” for two reasons: First, this is musically a more progressive song (evident during the solos) and the short period where we hear a choir in the backing vocals breaks this song apart from others on the record. This is the only song where we’ve heard anything like that. Not a terrible way to wrap up the record. Keep rocking! Dad’s Rating 6/10

The opinion above is protected under the Fair Use provision of United States Copyright Law, 17 U.S.C §107 which allows for the fair use of a copyrighted work for criticism without infringement on the copyright.

Eagles- One Of These Nights (1975): 14 January 2019

Eagles – One Of These Nights (1975)

This week on Your Dad’s Car Stereo, we’re covering the album the brought Eagles into the forefront of the 1970s rock scene and solidified their place on Classic Rock stations for decades. Formed in California in 1971, the quintet of Don Felder, Glenn Frey, Don Henley, Bernie Leadon, and Randy Meisner, were known as Eagles until Leadon was replaced by Joe Walsh. Despite releasing albums that churned out popular singles like Take It Easy, Witchy Woman, Peaceful Easy Feeling, and Desperado, it was this album, spawning three singles that launched them into the spotlight. You could say that it was this album where the Eagles really “took flight!”

One Of These Nights is, on the whole, an album about relationships. It features Hollywood Waltz, a song about loving and respecting your partner, but on the obverse side of the coin is Lyin’ Eyes, a song about cheating in relationships. The lead single, One Of These Nights, is about the darker aspects of humanity and expresses that there’s no need to hide that in a relationship and that there’s always someone out there like you. The album features a uniquely Eagles sound that is dominated by a country rock sound and borrows heavily from traditional cowboy/western ballads, particularly on songs like Too Many Hands and Visions.

Dad’s Thoughts- The Breakdown

One Of These Nights: This is one of the best songs put to vinyl. Period. Ever. The smooth rock track opens with haunting guitar before diving into a well-polished, grooving verse and features classic Eagles vocal harmonies in the chorus. Seriously, listen to this song if you’ve never heard it before, this is one of my all-time favorites, and for that it receives the first “They don’t make music like this anymore Award” for this series. Dad’s Rating: 10/10

Too Many Hands: Eagles followed one of the strongest singles they ever released with a slightly above average track. Certainly not a bad song but it just doesn’t hold a candle to the song that came before. I actually get a feeling that there was a cowboy/western United States influence on the music in this song that you can hear in the guitar riff at the end of each sentence in the chorus. Yee-haw! Dad’s Rating: 7/10

Hollywood Waltz: This song puts me to sleep. I had to listen to it a few times before I get a message out of the lyrics, and I actually found that I enjoy the message of learning to love someone. The cowboy ballad influence is strong in this one. Despite this, it still puts me to…ZzzzzzzzzzZZZZZzzzzzZZzzzz Dad’s Rating: 6/10

Journey Of The Sorcerer: A song for a full orchestra and a BANJO!! This was the soundtrack for Douglas Adams’ Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy to boot! I’m not sure who thought that a banjo would amplify an epic song appropriate for travelling across the universe, but thank goodness they did. Give this song a shot, it’s a little odd if you’re not familiar with Douglas Adams’ original radio show or the remade movie in the early aughts, but it’s a “journey” worth taking. Dad’s Rating: 8/10

Lyin’ Eyes: This was one of the lead singles off of One Of These Nights, and the soft rock/cowboy ballad is felt as much here as it is on Hollywood Waltz. This song is more palletable than the former for two reasons: 1. Classic Eagles vocal harmony is present that was sorely lacking on the earlier track and 2. The tempo doesn’t put you to sleep. I’d be lyin’ if I told you any different! Dad’s Rating: 7/10

Take It To The Limit: So this is a staple of classic rock radio to this day, and that makes sense considering it was the third single off of the album. This song deserves a sing-a-long every time it comes on, and it’s just a fantastic ballad that’s easy to listen to. The multiple building refrains at the end are one of my favorite parts. If you’ve never sat and listened to this then I can only recommend doing so. This song doesn’t just take the album to the limit of excellence, it pushes it over that limit and helped cement it in rock history.  Dad’s Rating: 8/10

Visions: This song actually surprised me because I had never listened to it before. Going in having never listened to it, it has come out as one of my favorites off the album. Visions is a classic 1970s southern rock song done right. It’s got a very Lynyrd Skynyrd feel to it. If you have even a passing interest in Skynyrd or CCR, this song will tickle the auricular orifices. Dad’s Rating: 8/10

After The Thrill Is Gone: Snooze. I know this is one of Eagles’ more popular songs, but skip it, particularly if you sat through Hollywood Waltz. Dad’s Rating: 5/10

I Wish You Peace: This is an interesting track to close off the album. I Wish You Peace is easily my least favorite song on the album and it sparked controversy within the band when it was recorded. Don Henley has spoken out against it, stating that it was only on the album at the request of Bernie Leadon and his girlfriend Patti Davis. It’s definitely an outlier on this album, and an outlier worth skipping. I hope this song can find peace with itself, considering no one listens to it. Dad’s Rating 4/10 The opinion above is protected under the Fair Use provision of United States Copyright Law, 17 U.S.C §107 which allows for the fair use of a copyrighted work for criticism without infringement on the copyright.