Black Sabbath- Master of Reality (1971): 18 November 2019

Black Sabbath – Master of Reality (1971)

Welcome back to YDCS! Remember that you can check out a playlist of the top songs from the blog HERE on Spotify! This week we’re taking a look at Black Sabbath’s third album, Master of Reality. I actually planned on reviewing a different album this week until “Children of the Grave” came on at work and I said, ‘Now that’s an album I need to cover!’ Master of Reality is a significant album for the band for a few reasons. First, the production cycle on this record was double what they had for their first two releases, and that shows in the both the quality of the recording and the musicianship put forward on every song. Second, Master of Reality is the first example of a full-fledged “Black Sabbath sound.” Yes, Paranoid was probably one of the most influential albums in the early development of heavy metal, black metal, and sludge rock, but Master of Reality is the first Sabbath album to feature their signature down-tuned guitars, giving the album a deeper, darker sound.

As an album, I can’t get enough of this one. I prefer Paranoid as a full body of work, but some of the songs on this album are the stuff of rock gods (looking at you “Children of the Grave”). There were even some tracks that I was surprised I liked as much as I did, notably “Sweet Leaf” and “Orchid.” Some of the album’s main themes are a continuation of the anti-war themes from Paranoid, drug use, and Christianity. It’s an odd combination that works well for an experimental album that features everything from loud, rocking solos to classical guitar pieces. This is an album for everyone, and I think you’ll find something to like about it. Enjoy!

Dad’s Thoughts- The Breakdown

Sweet Leaf: Ahh sweet leaf. La ganga estranja. That sticky icky. A friend named Mary Jane. An ode to marijuana. I’ve never been a drug user so I’m not even going to try and explain the lyrics except as possibly the most striking and overt tribute to marijuana. Now musically, this is a hell of a way to start an album! The multi-track cough taking from Tommy Iommi actually smoking a joint in the studio is an ingenious way to start a song, nevermind an album! On top of that, the first time I heard the solo on “Sweet Leaf” my mind was blown. The energy in Bill Ward’s drumming is infectious and I love how the song picks up to a frenetic tempo. “Sweet Leaf” is one of those hidden gems that unless you’re a Sabbath fan, you probably won’t know, but I strongly recommend giving it a listen. Dad’s Rating 9/10

After Forever: “After Forever” is an interesting song that may have been written just to quiet those who believed Sabbath were a bunch of Satanists. The whole song’s lyrics focus overtly on Christian themes but they’re sung over hard rock backing instrumentation. The instrumentation is good but the song feels like it’s missing something. Maybe it was too much of a lyrical push in one direction, and maybe it was that the instrumentation just didn’t stand up to the rest of the album, but it feels a bit hollow. Dad’s Rating 6/10

Embryo/Children of the Grave: I’d like to combine “Embryo” and “Children of the Grave” as the first acts as a great introduction to the other. On “Children of the Grave,” this is one of the baddest, most rocking songs ever written. Hands down. Let’s break it down. Ward drums like a madman on those backing high drums, Iommi’s guitar riff is absolutely iconic, and Osbourne’s vocals howl over everything else. The loud instrumentals are a great contrast to the lyrics advocating civil disobedience and non-violent change. The solos are stellar, the music is amazing, the composition and production are top-notch, and this is a 10/10. Dad’s Rating 10/10

Orchid: After a track like “Children of the Grave” you almost need something to calm down, and Black Sabbath completely went the other direction on Orchid, making an entirely acoustic, soft, classical guitar song. It’s almost as if the civil disobedience advocated for in the earlier song has blossomed. This is a really beautiful piece and completely unexpected on a Sabbath album. I really recommend listening to “Embryo,” “Children of the Grave,” and “Orchid” in order to get the effect of a full story, starting with the beginning of a journey, the adventure itself, and the resulting peace. Dad’s Rating 9/10

Lord of this World: This is the Sabbath that I know and love. “Lord of this World” perfectly captures the final evolution of the dark, down-tuned, heavy metal sound that Sabbath would be known for. This bass driven track has a little bit of groove, one of the better instrumental sections on the record, and I think it’s bassist Geezer Butler’s best work on the album. They really let him shine through here and it paid off. Dad’s Rating 7/10

Solitude: Black Sabbath struck the perfect balance between soft tracks and head bangers on Master of Reality, and “Solitude” is a great example of how to do a peaceful song that stays true to rock roots. There’s no real build to a loud finish, just a peaceful solitude. You really get the sense that the band tried to show more of their colors on this record with songs like this. They were multi-faceted musicians capable of telling a deeper story of peaceful resistance, belief in a higher power, and coming to terms with oneself. Dad’s Rating 8/10

Into the Void: We’re going to finish the record off with a hard rocker! I’d like to take a moment to appreciate that the song is driven by a pounding percussion session from Ward and Geezer. Osbourne’s vocal work on this track is the best on the record. He’s keeping up with some quick, complicated phrases and the final take is a great reflection of his work on that. The band has said this was their hardest song to record, both because of the vocals and because the song has an unnatural, syncopated beat. Ending the way they did with no notice is a great way to “mic drop” on their way out the door. They put together an awesome album and tied it together with a rocker of a final track. Well done! Dad’s Rating 7/10

The opinion above is protected under the Fair Use provision of United States Copyright Law, 17 U.S.C §107 which allows for the fair use of a copyrighted work for criticism without infringement on the copyright.

Janis Joplin- Pearl (1971): 21 October 2019

A quick note before we hop in to the review: You can now listen to Your Dad’s Car Stereo on Spotify with a playlist of every song that’s been rated 10/10. The link is on the right side of the page where you can also take a look at other songs I’ve had on repeat this week! This playlist will be updated every time there’s another 10/10, so make sure to follow the playlist and keep on rocking!

Janis Joplin – Pearl (1971)

Welcome back to YDCS! This week we’re covering the second solo studio album by Janis Joplin, and unfortunately, her first posthumous release, Pearl. Pearl was 95% complete before Joplin passed away in October of 1970, leaving only a partially finished song in “Buried Alive In The Blues,” which was sent to pressing without vocals. Joplin had direct input into the album’s content, this being her last album with that input. Pearl is atypical for an early 1970s rock album in that there’s a real variety of songs that you won’t hear anything else. There’s lots of ballads, funk and Motown influences, and even an a capella song. The other thing that stood out to me was that the produce for the album, Paul Rothchild, worked closely with the Doors through the late 1960s, and you can easily hear parallels to the keyboard forward sound of the Doors and the keyboard-centric mixing on the backing band.

Most of my experience with Janis Joplin’s music comes from her time with Big Brother and the Holding Company, particularly the song “Piece of My Heart,” so I wasn’t sure what to expect listening to Pearl and went in with an open mind. I’ll say that I was surprised! The powerful vocals that Joplin was known for were ever present but with the addition of what can almost be considered a funk element thanks to the backing from the Full Tilt Boogie Band.  Pearl is almost overwhelming because of the amount of heart and feeling that Joplin poured into each song. I felt like I needed to take a breath after the album was done. Pearl will make shivers run up your spine, that’s how good the vocal performance is. Sit through this one and enjoy it, this is a piece of art from the storyteller herself, Janis Joplin.

Dad’s Thoughts- The Breakdown

Move Over: “Move Over” is a great way to start off the album. We get a peak at the vocals that Joplin is known for with a funky rock track to boot. This is a sultry, up-tempo song that is really catchy and worth the listen! Dad’s Rating 7/10

Cry Baby: Holy moly. You want to talk about powerhouse songs? Yes? Then you want to talk about “Cry Baby.” Although this wasn’t an original song, Joplin made this all her own and blew it out of the park! The vocals are so intense and full of passion that it’s almost overwhelming. Her ability to the highest, most earth-shattering highs to the most compassionate lows is unrivaled. This may very well be Joplin’s opus magnus, and it will go down in rock and roll history as one of the best vocal performances ever. Dad’s Rating 10/10

A Woman Left Lonely: I’ve said it before; slow songs don’t often hold my attention very well, but “A Woman Left Lonely” was able to do it. The vocals are, once again, spot on, and just as wild as they were on “Cry Baby,” if slightly more restrained. After a track like “Cry Baby” you almost need something more restrained, so credit goes to the production team for organizing the record. This is a great example of a ballad done right. Slow but powerful and building towards a great climax. Dad’s Rating 7/10

Half Moon: A return to a funk inspired sound waits for us on “Half Moon.” This is a great chance to talk about the backing band for the album, the Full Tilt Boogie Band. They don’t get nearly enough credit for their contribution because they’re always overshadowed by Joplin, but this is a great example of the musicianship. At this point, funk was a relatively new genre (having originated in the 1960s) and the Boogie Band did a standup job of introducing it to a wider audience before it took the world by storm with the introduction of disco later in the decade. Great track and great chance for the other musicians to show off their stuff. Dad’s Rating 8/10

Buried Alive In The Blues: This was the only unfinished track on the album and was supposed to have a vocal accompaniment, but Joplin passed away before she could record the vocals. What we were left with is a blues track that would have made her proud. Listening to this, you can almost hear her voice and what she would have been singing. Full credit goes to the Full Tilt Boogie Band for laying down a rocking track. Dad’s Rating 6/10

My Baby: “My Baby” is the only song on the album to feature a backing choir, and while it wasn’t necessary (Joplin’s vocals could have carried the song easily), it’s nice to hear her interaction with other singers. This definitely feels like a southern gospel inspired song with the heavy emphasis on the organ throughout. It’s also a great tribute to Joplin’s southern roots.  Dad’s Rating 7/10

Me and Bobby McGee: “Me and Bobby McGee” may be Joplin’s most well-known song and helped propel Pearl to success. At the time, this was a recent cover, the original having been released in 1969. Musically, I love that Joplin uses this song to show off a wide range of her vocal talent, starting quietly and slowly before building into a rockabilly riot at the end while seeming to dance at will up and down scales. The beginning in particular shows that you don’t have to have a loud voice to be powerful; it’s all in how you use it. Dad’s Rating 10/10

Mercedes Benz: This is one of the most unique songs that I think we’ve listened to thus far. Recorded in one take, three days prior to her death, this a capella song is largely understood to be a rejection of consumerism. This is really a landmark song for a rock album. No one else at this time would have dared to put a vocal only track on a rock record, but Joplin did it. This is a true testament to her willingness to experiment with what rock music was and break the barriers of the genre. Dad’s Rating 8/10

Trust Me: “Trust Me” gives me an immediate feeling of the Motown sound. I really don’t have anything bad to say about this song; it’s got a great buildup, passionate vocals, fantastic musicianship, and is everything you would expect from Joplin. This is probably one of the most hidden gems on the album. Most people know about “Me and Bobby McGee” and “Cry Baby,” but this is one of the better ones that most people haven’t listened to. It’s worth a listen, so give it a shot! Dad’s Rating 7/10

Get It While You Can: We’re finishing Pearl off with a rock ballad, and it’s not a bad one by any means, but it doesn’t stand out as much as some of the other songs on the record. “Cry Baby” and “A Woman Left Lonely” hold my attention better and I think they’re more interesting to listen to from a performance standpoint. Dad’s Rating 6/10

The opinion above is protected under the Fair Use provision of United States Copyright Law, 17 U.S.C §107 which allows for the fair use of a copyrighted work for criticism without infringement on the copyright.

The Allman Brothers Band- At Fillmore East (1971): 5 August 2019

The Allman Brothers Band – At Fillmore East (1971)

Welcome back to Your Dad’s Car Stereo where we’re taking a listen to one of the best live albums ever put to vinyl (and what could be included on a list of the best albums of all time), At Fillmore East by the Allman Brothers Band. At Fillmore East was the third album released by the band and is notable for the fact that their previous two albums only bubbled into the lowest numbers of the Billboard Hot 200. Recorded over two nights of performances in New York, the Fillmore East concerts proved to be significant for the band, launching them into the national spotlight and solidifying their place in the Southern Rock movement. This 4-side LP went on to be the Allman Brothers’ first platinum selling album and is a fine example of how blues, jazz, and southern rock can come together in one album, from two nights of shows, to make a masterpiece.

I can’t say enough good things about this album, and having never listened to it the full way through before this listen, it has quickly become one of my favorites. The audio is impeccable and this record captures the true spirit of a live act. The band has gone on to say that the concerts were slightly above average but generally captured the live energy and performance quality. Each night after the show, the band went back to the studio to listen back to the recording to decide what was acceptable and what wasn’t, as they were opposed to overdubbing the record, citing the fact that if they did that, it wouldn’t be a truly live album. I recommend listening to this album in one go with a set of headphones to get the fullest live experience that you can. At Fillmore East is a true masterpiece of rock, blues, and jazz coming together seamlessly in one album, and I hope you enjoy it as much as I did.

Dad’s Thoughts- The Breakdown

Statesboro Blues: “Statesboro Blues” is exactly how you would hope that a southern rock/blues rock album would start. The slide on the electric guitar stood out the most to me, I haven’t heard that “extreme” use of the slide in the early 1970s before Lynyrd Skynyrd came onto the scene, so that’s a great example of the band forging a path for the future of the genre and for their own sound. The song has two short jam sessions in it that don’t particularly enhance the song, but the vocals are great and this is generally just a good, good song. Dad’s Rating 7/10

Done Somebody Wrong: The off-beat intro that built into an on-beat song had me hooked from the start. That’s some great musicality! I really liked “Done Somebody Wrong,” perhaps more so than “Statesboro Blues.” The latter is more subdued, which I think lends better to blues in general. I like how the song build from the quieter verses into the guitar solos at the end of each, showing you two ways that blues rock can be done. This is a great track, give it a listen! Dad’s Rating 8/10

Stormy Monday: I normally don’t like slow songs as much as faster paced songs, but “Stormy Monday” is an exception to the rule. The blues are so smooth on this track, making you feel like you’re in a smoky bar somewhere in New Orleans listening to a live group, not a recording of a band made in New York. The slow pace of “Stormy Monday” is exactly what the album needed and gives the musicians a different way to show their skills. In a sense, anyone can play quickly, but when the song slows down, technique becomes apparent, and these gents can play. Wash your cares away with the blues and enjoy this stunning track. Dad’s Rating 8/10

You Don’t Love Me: At over nineteen minutes long, “You Don’t Love Me” looks like a daunting song to tackle, but this bluesy track is full of instrumentals that keep listeners engaged the whole way through. Originally written by Willie Cobbs in 1960 and adapted from a Bo Diddly song, Duane Allman selected “You Don’t Love Me” as one of the extended jam songs for the Fillmore East concerts after hearing another cover of it on a Junior Wells album. The Allman Brothers sped up the tempo significantly from the original for their cover, giving it more credit as a rock song than its original blues. The drive of this song is infectious and you really can’t help but tap your foot to the beat. In my opinion, this is one of the best songs on the album. The jam session is faultless and the cover harkens back to the original while managing to be unique. The instrumentation is top-notch and I’ve found something new each time I’ve listened back to it this week. Really great stuff here! Dad’s Rating 10/10

Hot ‘Lanta: “Hot ‘Lanta” acts as the perfect instrumental transition song on this album, linking together elements of the blues, southern rock, and folk that we’ve heard in one song. The keyboard solo is something I never expected to hear, but it’s a job well done and I enjoyed hearing it. There are elements of jazz and progressive rock on this song to that we find on some of the longer songs like “You Don’t Love Me” and “Whipping Post” too. This is another great song, and the only place you’ll hear it is on a live album because the Allman Brothers never put it on a studio album. Dad’s Rating 9/10

In Memory of Elizabeth Reed: Another surprise coming from the Allman Brothers Band! I’ve never heard “In Memory of Elizabeth Reed” before and I’m blown away! This is a TIGHT rock track that manages to weave elements of jazz and latin music into a southern rock album. It never loses its roots. The instrumentation is out of this world, the whole band is so in sync and playing off each other that it makes this a joy to listen to. I find myself legitimately at a loss for words trying to describe how good this song is, and it may be one of the best jazz inspired tracks I’ve listened to. Whatever you do, don’t skip this one.  Dad’s Rating 10/10

Whipping Post: The Allman Brothers had to finish the concert with their biggest song to date, and “Whipping Post” doesn’t disappoint! You can even hear the fans cheering for them to play it when you listen to the album. This extended version of “Whipping Post” clocks in at just over twenty-three minutes long and features multiple lengthy solos during the multiple jam sessions, each one broken up by a round of the chorus. I can’t fault this song; this is an opus for the Allman Brothers Band, and it’s perfect the way that it is. There’s so much energy and soul poured into this live version of “Whipping Post” that the song plays at a frenetic pace, even during the slowed down sections. I kid you not when I say that you can sit there for twelve or thirteen minutes without realizing that you’ve been listening to the same song the whole time, it’s that engaging. Finally the ending maybe the most un-abashed and thunderous finale to a concert I have ever heard. This is southern rock. Period. Dad’s Rating 10/10

The opinion above is protected under the Fair Use provision of United States Copyright Law, 17 U.S.C §107 which allows for the fair use of a copyrighted work for criticism without infringement on the copyright.

Led Zeppelin- Untitled (Led Zeppelin IV) (1971): 24 June 2019

Led Zeppelin – Untitled (1971)

We’ve made it through June and Led Zeppelin Month! We’re on the last album in the Led Zeppelin I-IV Anthology this week, and now is as good a time as any to bring up the fact that “Led Zeppelin IV” isn’t actually the name of the album we’ve been building towards. After poor reception to Led Zeppelin III, the band decided to release their fourth album without a title or any text on the outer record sleeve, effectively making this an untitled album. For ease of reference, we’re going to follow long-standing tradition here and call the untitled fourth album Led Zeppelin IV. No more beating around the bush, let’s talk about the album.

Led Zeppelin IV is what I would describe as a culmination of three years-worth of evolution, learning, and finding themselves as a band. Think back to Led Zeppelin I and the sound on that record. The album was brash, loud, and uncomplicated. It was also an announcement that these gents were here to rock. Led Zeppelin II took the sound of the first album and started to refine it, moving from a bluesier sound to a folksier sound. Led Zeppelin III expanded on the early folk influences of II and started to show more musical dynamism and thoughtful songwriting. Finally, Led Zeppelin IV pulls all of that together into an album for the ages. It’s dynamic, musical, thoughtful, complex but accessible, and is the culmination of a journey. This wasn’t the band’s last album, and they would go on to have more successful albums in the future, but this album is where all of those albums start. Enjoy the climax of our journey through Led Zeppelin’s early discography and one of the most important rock albums of all time.

Dad’s Thoughts- The Breakdown

Black Dog: Every single Led Zeppelin album up to this point has opened with a really strong start, and “Black Dog” is no exception to that rule. Make it four in a row! “Black Dog” was released as one of the singles for the album and has gone on to be one of the songs most synonymous with Led Zeppelin.  Musically, the song sounds different to most rock songs of the early 1970s and stands out because of its odd time signature. It also features a call-and-response throughout the song that wasn’t a commonly employed musical technique in rock at the time. Lots of musical experimentation going on with this song, and that theme will carry us through the album. Dad’s Rating 9/10

Rock and Roll: “Rock and Roll” is a great rock track. It actually stands out among rock tracks for me. The energy in this song is contagious and helps it stand out from the crowded field of “simple rock songs” from the early 70s. That energy really is the most important part of this song. Sure, it relies on the Led Zeppelin-tested blues rock base with loud guitars and wailing vocals on top, but this sounds more refined than what we’ve heard on early albums. The blues aren’t quite so forward and the instrumentation has its dynamic moments. This shows that the band really has developed and incorporated different techniques into their music across the four albums we’ve covered. Dad’s Rating 7/10

The Battle of Evermore: There’s quite a lot going on with “The Battle of Evermore,” and I think the best way to look at it is by breaking it down into elements. The lyrics are great and based on high fantasy themes, particular the works of J.R.R. Tolkien. The stringed instrumentation (a guitar and mandolin in this case) provide the perfect mix of folk rock to, what could almost be considered, an adventure song found in a movie or the pub of a fantasy world. Plant’s vocals weave you through the story with exceptional attention paid to the highs and lows. This is probably the most progressive piece in the group’s catalog up to this point, and it is a really good song. If you’ve never had a listen, don’t skip this one. Dad’s Rating 9/10

Stairway to Heaven: Wow. I get goosebumps every time I listen to “Stairway,” and if it’s not the best rock song ever written, it’s in the top 5. There are NO words to describe the pure emotion behind the lyrics, nor the exquisite instrumentals. I honestly don’t want to write about this song because I will never do it the justice that it deserves; I would prefer to let it speak for itself. Take seven minutes, put headphones on, and immerse yourself in “Stairway.” That’s all I feel I can say without insulting this beautiful song. Dad’s Rating 10/10

Misty Mountain Hop: We’ve moved on to the B Side of Led Zeppelin IV, and it opens with “Misty Mountain Hop.” There’s a lot that I like about this song, from the heaviness compared to “Stairway” and “Evermore” and how refined it sounds compared to some of the earliest rockers from Zep. The heaviness on this song actually reminded me of Deep Purple songs from around this time. There is one unsettling part of this track for me, and that’s the vocal harmonies during the verses. I think they were meant to clash, but it was surprising to me from, particularly from Zeppelin. I appreciate the effort to try new musical techniques, so it gets points for that, but the execution was a little odd. Dad’s Rating 7/10

Four Sticks: “Four Sticks” was one of the songs that I had never listened to before I put the album on, and it’s a great track! It has a really interesting, drum-driven feel that makes the song like it’s consistently racing forward and Jones’ bass work is really solid on this song. There aren’t many places where these guys really get the chance to shine through on this album but they made the most of that opportunity here! Dad’s Rating 7/10

Going to California: “Going to California” is exactly the kind of song you don’t expect to come from Led Zeppelin unless you’ve been following the progression of their music. This is a beautifully performed ballad with a great folk rock influence. This acoustic track is simple and elegant all the way through. Plant’s vocals shine through on this song, and the modulation that they did to them on the chorus shows that they’re not done experimenting with new techniques to make their music sound better.  Dad’s Rating 7/10

When the Levee Breaks: This was the only cover on this album, taken from an old blues classic of the same name by Memphis Minnie. The blues are immediately apparent with the introduction of the harmonica, the slower pace, and blues chord structure, but this feels like a more refined way of incorporating it into rock music. Where they had previously just played blues tracks on rock and roll instruments, this feels like there was specific attention paid to the composition to give the original a rocking sound. Job well done. Dad’s Rating 8/10

Thanks for sticking with Led Zeppelin Month! Next week we move into July and back to regular programming with a different artist every week. Next week: Jefferson Airplane!

The opinion above is protected under the Fair Use provision of United States Copyright Law, 17 U.S.C §107 which allows for the fair use of a copyrighted work for criticism without infringement on the copyright.

Yes- The Yes Album (1971): 4 February 2019

Yes – The Yes Album (1971)

We’re going back to 1971 this week on YDCS to take a look at one of the acts most responsible for the creation of progressive rock music, the English rock band Yes. For the thus far uninitiated, progressive rock was a subgenre of rock music that started developing in the late 1960s and early 1970s. It was characterized by the use of unusual instruments, time signatures, fantastical, philosophical, or science fiction lyrics, and breaking the traditional moulds of song structure. Fortunately for the band, The Yes Album was a commercial breakthrough with songs like Yours is No Disgrace and I’ve Seen All Good People, especially considering that they were at risk of being dropped by their label if this album, their third, didn’t perform to expectation.

The Yes Album was the first Yes album to feature guitarist Steve Howe who would ultimately stay with the band through its most successful period through 1981 before the band broke up and reformed later in the year without him. This was also the last album to feature Tony Kaye on keyboard after he refused to branch out and play the mini-moog or synthesizer on their next album, Fragile. Kaye was quickly replaced by Rick Wakeman on Fragile leading to the band’s most successful lineup. If this is your first Yes album, don’t be off put by the runtimes on the songs. Yours is No Disgrace is the longest track on the album at around 9:40, but there are two other songs that give it a “runtime” for its money. Sit back and just enjoy letting the instruments weave between each other to create a stunning album.

Dad’s Thoughts- The Breakdown

Yours is No Disgrace: This is a rockin’ start to the album! The song transitions between a few themes including some fantastic keyboard playing from Kaye and insanely catchy guitar riffs from Howe in the middle of the track. The guitar solo in the middle of the track is my favorite because of how it uses the wah to add some groove to the track before transitioning back to a more traditional picking technique. Around that midpoint in the song is when we start to see the bass come more into the forefront too and drive the song forward. I think you’ll like the vocal harmony from the band through the entire song and don’t find it to be a disgrace! Dad’s Rating 9/10

The Clap: The Clap is a great little folksy guitar solo written by Howe. This is one of my favorite songs on the album even though it doesn’t really fit with the sound of the album. As he describes it, it was the first solo that he felt comfortable performing. I particularly enjoy the quick changes between picking and strumming that give this song a unique sound. Howe’s technical ability really shines through on this song. I’m not a guitar player but I definitely appreciate the difficulty of the song. This song always brings a smile to my face, and it’s hard to not be happy and smiling with a calm little ditty like this playing. Try not to bop your head along to the song, I dare you! Dad’s Rating 8/10

Starship Trooper (A. Life Seeker; B. Disillusion; C. Wurm): Starship Trooper is the first of two songs on this album that’s split into three parts. This is fairly common amongst progressive rock bands, where songs would be split into multiple parts that would explore a different theme in each section or would try to evoke a different emotion in each section. Yes did this on multiple albums, but most notably on Close to the Edge and Tales From Topographic Oceans (stay tuned for album reviews on those later!). The song transitions between the different sections very nicely and it’s very clear where the transition from Life Seeker to Disillusion occurs, the same is true for Disillusion to Wurm. Disillusion is my favorite part of the song and sadly the shortest. It shows more technical guitar ability from Howe Dad’s Rating 7/10

I’ve Seen All Good People: a. Your Move, b. All Good People: This song is the second multi-part song on the album after Starship Trooper, and where Wurm was slightly lacking on the former, there’s not a bad part of this song. This song is classic Yes, classic prog rock, and is one of Yes’ best-known songs. Good People gives you a little bit of everything that makes Yes such a quirky band and so much fun to listen to: vocal harmony, accompaniment on a church organ, and a rocking up-tempo part after Your Move opens into All Good People.  Dad’s Rating 8/10

A Venture: A Venture is one of the more unique songs on the album, and like The Clap, it doesn’t seem to fit with the sound of the rest of the album. It’s much more restrained, features significantly less vocal harmony, and there’s not unusual instruments. A Venture gets credit for displaying Kaye’s skills on the piano with his solo at the end of this song. The solo feels fresh and, in my opinion, actually provides a breath of fresh air on the album. When every song on an album sounds the same, the album can become stale, but the different tone of this song actually refreshes the sound for the last song, Perpetual Change, which is more of a return to the more familiar “Yes sound” on this album. Dad’s Rating 8/10

Perpetual Change: Yes wanted to close this album out with a bang and a return to their signature sound. This song has philosophical lyrics, masterful instrumentation from the band members, and more time signature changes than you can count. That’s actually my favorite part of this song for two reasons: firstly, they keep you on your toes and make you actively listen to the song as opposed to passively listening to it and letting it wash over you, and secondly it fits the title of the song very appropriately! The song is titled perpetual change for a reason and the song does exactly that! One minute you’ll be listening to a soft ballad, then the song shifts to a ripping guitar solo, then it goes back to ballad, then you’ll be listening to something that sounds like it should be the song to lead in the evening news! (see if you can spot that part of the song) Yes was unapologetically themselves with this last song on their last ditch effort album, and it ended up paying off. Dad’s Rating 7/10

The opinion above is protected under the Fair Use provision of United States Copyright Law, 17 U.S.C §107 which allows for the fair use of a copyrighted work for criticism without infringement on the copyright.