The Doors – Morrison Hotel (1970): 4 March 2019

The Doors – Morrison Hotel (1970)

Another week on YDCS and I think it is time we slow down and take a rest for a minute, maybe at the Morrison Hotel? That’s right, this week we’re covering Morrison Hotel by The Doors. Morrison Hotel was a comeback album of sorts for The Doors. Their previous album was commercially a flop, lead singer Jim Morrison had been involved in a string of civil involvements stemming from his abuse of alcohol, and the band needed something to lift them back up. While this album didn’t produce the band’s best-known works (those come, on the whole, from LA Woman and The Doors), Morrison Hotel was a return to form for the band and would be the penultimate studio album released during the life of Jim Morrison.

The Doors grew to popularity during the mid-1960s when psychedelic rock was the flavor of the day. Their early work has strong influences of the times, but the band was dynamic, shifting away from their psychedelic roots in the early 1970s towards a bluesy-er sound and incorporating more spoken word in their music, often written by Morrison himself. However, Jim Morrison is not the whole story of the band. It would be remiss to not mention the organ and keyboard present in all of their songs played by the masterful Ray Manzarek. Manzarek’s skill behind the keyboard is legendary and is on par with the best in the rock music industry. He, along with John Densmore and Robby Krieger all went on to have successful careers in music after the dissolution of the band. Enjoy the album!

Dad’s Thoughts- The Breakdown

Roadhouse Blues: The bluesy sound that The Doors transitioned to is immediately evident on the opening track to the album. This song sounds so different from any of the band’s earlier work and is entirely reminiscent of a traditional Mississippi Delta Blues track. Let it roll baby! Dad’s Rating 8/10

Waiting For The Sun: Keep in mind that this is still very much a transition album for The Doors. Waiting For The Sun is a return to their old form and the psychedelic influence is strong. Listen to the album Strange Days and I think you’ll find more like this. Musically this song isn’t particularly impressive. There are other psychedelic songs from the same two years on either side of this release that are more musically complex than this (White Rabbit by Jefferson Airplane comes to mind), and frankly this song is slightly boring and repetitive. Dad’s Rating 6/10

You Make Me Real: You Make Me Real is one of the hidden gems of the album in my opinion. The piano throughout the song, but particularly in the opening seconds of the song, evokes thoughts of wild west saloons solely by its tonality. The just works really well together. Take into account the lyrics “I really want you, really do,” and combine that with the driving pace of the song and the music puts more urgency behind those words. This is definitely not one to skip over! Dad’s Rating 8/10

Peace Frog: This isn’t just one of my favorite songs by The Doors, this is one of my favorite songs period! The lyrics are a poem written by Morrison that he adapted into the lyrics for the song. Musically, this song hits all the notes…the drums give the song a little bit of a groove, the guitar is masterful, and the keys have a classic Doors sound. The guitar solo in this song is one of Robby Krieger’s best. It’s not a long solo so keep your ear out for it, but it rocks! Dad’s Rating 9/10

Blue Sunday: Peace Frog runs directly into Blue Sunday and the juxtaposition of the snappy pace of Peace Frog and the slowed down pace of this song is pleasant. Morrison’s vocals really shine through on this song, and up to this point, there aren’t any examples of his crooning ability. The prior four songs are all very rough vocally, so having a change of pace is a relief. Dad’s Rating 7/10

Ship Of Fools: Dynamically, Ship Of Fools might be one of the best songs on the album. Listen to how the songs builds from the beginning into the boisterous verses before retreating during the interlude and solo and rebuilding in the last third of the song. I always appreciate a song that manages to do that well because it keeps the song from going stale. You would be a fool to skip this song! Dad’s Rating 7/10

Land Ho!: This is an unusual song for me because I’m not particularly hot or cold on it either way. It flows well from Ship Of Fools but the message doesn’t resonate and the instrumentals are lackluster. If you’ve listened to the rest of the album up to this point then this one is worth skipping. Dad’s Rating 5/10

The Spy: The Spy is a combination of the blues-form that we’ve heard on earlier tracks on the album and the slowed down ballad where Morrison’s vocals shine through. The way the song swells and fades is stereotypical of down tempo blues tracks and they did a very good job with that here. This is the perfect song to sit back and enjoy listening to Manzarek’s fingers dance up and down the keys in the background. Dad’s Rating 6/10

Queen Of The Highway: This another one of those songs where the lyrics don’t resonate with me, but I’ll give it more credit than Land Ho! because the instrumentals pulled me in on this track. I almost completely ignored Morrison’s singing on this track and focused on how the three guitars interwove their parts together. Listening exclusively to the instruments, the song sounds like a garage jam session where all the personnel are in sync and enjoying what they do. If you approach the song from that angle as opposed o head on with the vocals taking front and center then I think you’ll find more enjoyment in it. Dad’s Rating 7/10

Indian Summer: I liked this song a lot. This is such a peaceful song to listen to with a timeless message about love. Nothing is overdone on this track which lets the listener focus on the lyrics and Morrison’s voice. Combining those two things together, the song seems much more personal and endearing. Dad’s Rating 8/10

Maggie McGill: There’s no more fitting way to close out The Doors’ blues inspired album than with a blues track. This song retains the iconic keyboard solo and growling Morrison voice, but lacks anything inspiring. Compared to the earlier part of the album, this song just doesn’t have any punch to it. I’m rating this song jointly as the lowest on the album but I wouldn’t skip this one like I would Land Ho!. This song redeems itself by showcasing the blues sound that hadn’t been heard on the band’s albums prior to this release. Dad’s Rating 5/10

The opinion above is protected under the Fair Use provision of United States Copyright Law, 17 U.S.C §107 which allows for the fair use of a copyrighted work for criticism without infringement on the copyright.

Author: James M

My name is James and I'm just a music enthusiast! I listen to all genres and my favorites are classic rock, indie, and jazz.

One thought on “The Doors – Morrison Hotel (1970): 4 March 2019”

  1. Thanks. I enjoyed Ship of Fools and Peace Frog also. I have heard Roadhouse Blues before. Always good Blues rhythm.

    Like

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